The Lynch of Locke Lamora

HA HA MOTHERFUCKERS YOU EXPECTED COMPETENCE AND YOU GOT THE OFFICIAL TUMBLR OF SCOTT LYNCH INSTEAD! A WORK MOST DECIDEDLY IN PROGRESS.

Apr 18

Anonymous asked: In RSURS you describe the workings of the ships with great intimacy. Did you do laborious research on this for the book, or are you just a naval nerd?

I’m a huge naval research nerd. ;) The Hornblower novels, the Aubrey-Maturin novels, and a whole bunch of reference texts, including some primary sources like R.H. Dana’s TWO YEARS BEFORE THE MAST. I did a lot of scribbling on paper, diagrammed the ships, and used a desktop compass rose to track winds and headings for the naval actions in the book.


Apr 17

A Brief Appreciation of the Purple Wedding

Be warned that this post contains spoilers for the 3rd and 4th seasons of GAME OF THRONES and for that cute little series of books ol’ whatshisname wrote.

Thanks to the archaic rules of cable television (they probably seemed like a great idea back in 1992) it turns out I can’t actually sign up for HBO GO and get my weekly fix just yet. I have, however, indulged myself in a good long look at the pivotal Purple Wedding scene via Youtube, because I am a nerd. It’s the bit where King Joffrey “Baratheon” finally sashays off this mortal coil, and you can’t say he hasn’t worked day and night to deserve the trip.

Now, I had some qualms about the Red Wedding, the third-season climax in which Lord Walder Frey’s castle truly earned its one-star Yelp rating as a wedding reception hall. It pulled no punches, but the extreme brutality of it made even me cringe, and the extended duration of the suffering reached the edges of self-parody, especially with Robb’s soft little gasp as he finally finally FINALLY died and the sheer get-the-fuck-on-with-it quality of Catelyn Stark’s murder of Lady Frey before she took a number and stood in line to get her own throat slit.

I’m more fond of the way the Purple Wedding was handled.

The first striking thing about the Purple Wedding is the strained silence raised by the Joffrey/Tyrion conflict. This is a court that has been absolutely wrung out by the whims and viciousness of Joffrey, to the point that nobody knows when to even pretend to laugh anymore. Having everyone stonily not play along is a very canny directing decision, because it lets the court itself have an emotional arc. Jesus, these people are tired and nervous at this point in the story. After death, war, siege, more death, horrible rumors, and the reign of a brutal young poltroon, these people can’t even be bothered to keep their social masks in place. This atmosphere, more than any pile of blood-spurting corpses, serves notice that life for these folks has become a constant disaster.

The second thing is the immensely clever chain of suspicion the episode constructs around possible sources for the poison, using techniques of simple emphasis that any writer should gleefully pilfer for their own use. Note how each of the following things is shown, and given equal narrative weight, without any added music to hint at ominous preparations:

1. Joffrey knocks his cup around like a spoiled child so that it spends a few moments under a table;
2. Sansa is the one who picks the cup up before handing it to Tyrion;
3. Tyrion pours the wine from the decanter in front of Cersei;
4. Joffrey drinks, then passes the goblet to Margaery;
5. Margaery sets it down near Olenna, where it remains for several moments;
6. The king is the first to eat the pie, and is served by Margaery;
7. When Joffrey’s distress becomes apparent, Olenna is the first to loudly shout for help;
8. Ser Dontos immediately approaches Sansa and warns her to leave the wedding.

Even without the need to speculate on all the webs of conspiracy woven around this court, the episode visually establishes a complete array of direct suspects (Tyrion, Sansa, Margaery, Olenna, Dontos) and also drops a hint that the poison might have been aimed at someone else (Cersei).

Readers of the books will eventually discover where the poison came from, but I’m ignoring them for a moment to admire the artfulness of the TV version of this scene. There’s nothing wrong with the Purple Wedding in the original text; it’s still very effective, but it’s also written from Tyrion’s point of view, so barring the possibility of extreme POV dishonesty, the reader can rule him out as a deliberate poisoner right away. The TV show has the luxury of keeping him in the mix as a genuine suspect, and does so with style.


Apr 16

qwertyprophecy:

Gentleman Bastard themed playing cards (or, a Carousel Hazard deck ambiguously appropriated into an illustrated poker deck). Done as part of the GB chat’s Secret Sanza.

Featuring:

Mister of Chalices: Locke Lamora
Mistress of Chalices: Jean Tannen
Sigil of Chalices: Bug

Mister of Sabres: Grey King
Mistress of Sabres: Zamira Drakasha
Sigil of Sabres: Ezri Delmastro

Mister of Flowers: Patience
Mistress of Flowers: Sabetha Belacoros
Sigil of Flowers: Falconer

Mister of Spires: Capa Barsavi
Mistress of Spires: Requin
Sigil of Spires: Father Chains

Jokers: Calo and Galdo Sanza

(Trivia: The big symbol on the backside is something of a personal headcanon shorthand for the twelve plus one gods. Also, the drop shapes on Two of Chalices symbolise the tears of readers everywhere.)

I’m just gonna sit back and let Miles make all the Gentleman Bastard stuff from now on.

Apr 15

The true cause of these lunar eclipses? All the telepathic kids breaking out of secret government institutions. You’d think someone at DHS would read some X-Men comics and figure out that these places just don’t work.


sixpennies:

So at work, we get half an hour in the morning to warm up and draw whatever we like. I’m not sure how far this goes towards improving my artistic integrity but I’m pretty sure it’s still important.
Somehow.



J’aime le requin et les garçons et la fille!

sixpennies:

So at work, we get half an hour in the morning to warm up and draw whatever we like. I’m not sure how far this goes towards improving my artistic integrity but I’m pretty sure it’s still important.

Somehow.

J’aime le requin et les garçons et la fille!

(via matociquala)


lynkhart asked: Hello! I'm sure I read somewhere that you described the gods as being anthropomorphic (I'm guessing in the vein of the ancient Egyptian pantheon?) and I've been wondering ever since what they actually look like. I've been re-reading TRoT and see that Gandolo is described as being 'fat and infinitely content' which aside from making me think of the Buddha, instantly brings cats to mind! Of course now that I've said that he'll probably turn out to be a very prosperous hippo or something...

Way back in the day, we’re talking dawn of time here, when ambitious fish had yet to crawl gasping onto the beach and there were only two volumes of A Song of Ice and Fire available in stores… I had a notion that I wanted the gods in this story to be something like a cross between Ghede Loa and Greek deities, very hands-on, willing to come and go among mortals as they pleased, willing to talk and trick and bargain and roll in the hay and seriously pervert the course of human destiny. That vision, sadly, directly conflicted with the approach I ultimately chose (Sarah Monette explained it really well recently when she said that my characters have dead serious religions, but I take care to never confirm or deny the objective existence of the gods in their world). As for what the Therins think their gods look like, they do describe them as completely anthropomorphic and generally too proud to take other shapes. The Vadrans do not have gods (as one of them points out smugly in THORN, Therins have a “god of the sea” but Vadrans just have the sea, full stop. It’s there, it’s inarguable, it encloses the mortal world, it doesn’t need symbolic representation, it simply and plainly IS). The Syresti have a pantheon sharing some gods with the Therins under different names (Zamira Drakasha, for example, thinks of Iono as Usharas). The Okanti have a tiered system of distant ruling gods and intermediaries anointed from the ranks of mortal heroes. The Jeremites have a two-god system and philosophy that coincidentally justifies the fact that they’re total assholes. The Jereshites worship the Therin pantheon as representatives of a unifying controller god and privately wish the Jeremites would all die in a fire. The mysterious peoples over the seas, cut off from Locke’s world by the barriers of mists and storms left by those lovable scamps, the Eldren, won’t be revealing their preferences for some time yet.


copperandcream:

So, msfehrwight asked what kind of tattoo she would have according to her blog… This just wouldn’t leave me alone before I had drawn it.



Spiffing day, what what!

copperandcream:

So, msfehrwight asked what kind of tattoo she would have according to her blog… This just wouldn’t leave me alone before I had drawn it.

Spiffing day, what what!

Apr 14

maybenotboring asked: for a bondsmage's purposes, would a trans person's chosen name/identification be considered their red name? in RoT, Patience says a red name is "the very first identity that we accept and recognize as us" and that "most" get them from what parents name them. does that leave leeway for someone whose true and recognized identity is not that which they grew up being called?

This is a very interesting metaphysical question; what we’re dealing with here is the old tradition of the sorcerous power of the True Name, and so it’s the name rather than the bodily or gender identity that’s most important/dangerous. The “red name” Patience describes is the first idea-symbol that means US, at the very first moment in our lives we understand there is an US, and casting that weight off is very, very difficult for most if not all human beings. None of this can be more than informed apocrypha, mind you, but I would allow that someone who underwent a profound and sincere dislocation from their originally-received sense of self might very well find the hooks of bondsmagi sorcery weakened. Absolute escape from the power of a red name seems… unlikely, but as we have seen, when a mage is preparing to harm you every little bit of slack you can get can be life-saving.

As will eventually be made fairly explicit to Locke, sorcery follows the forms of poetic logic rather than rationalistic logic; things work because it seems like they just ought to work (to put it least elegantly). So your proposition strikes me as perfectly fair play by the terms of magic in Locke’s world.


Anonymous asked: Hi there Scott! I was wondering (if it's not too spoiler-y) if we could expect to see any more LGBT characters in the future books? One of the things I love the most about your books are their inclusivity <3 Thanks, and take care!

Sure, take a gander at this post:

http://scottlynch78.tumblr.com/post/78204978202/vadrans-sex-sexuality-and-shootin-things


buckybuns:

For my ragtag friends on twitter who are always up to shenanigans. (Also needed this out of my head.)



Fuck HYDRA, we&#8217;re going to Disneyland.

buckybuns:

For my ragtag friends on twitter who are always up to shenanigans. (Also needed this out of my head.)

Fuck HYDRA, we’re going to Disneyland.

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