The Lynch of Locke Lamora

HA HA MOTHERFUCKERS YOU EXPECTED COMPETENCE AND YOU GOT THE OFFICIAL TUMBLR OF SCOTT LYNCH INSTEAD! A WORK MOST DECIDEDLY IN PROGRESS.

Apr 9
April 8th marks the release of Elizabeth Bear’s STELES OF THE SKY, the conclusion of her Eternal Sky trilogy. Although Bear has worked on epic themes before, this is her first pure-form epic fantasy, and as she is wont to do she sticks the landing. The first book, RANGE OF GHOSTS, was excellent, but in my opinion its two sequels have surpassed it.  

Disclaimer: I have been dating this woman since 2011. But as I often say, I liked her work long, long before that. I rediscover how much I like it with every new project she lets me read.

The term Bear has gleefully borrowed to describe the Eternal Sky sequence is “Silk Road fantasy;” this is a secondary world based on the vast network of trade that ran from the shores of the Pacific to the sands of Arabia and beyond, during the centuries we now think of as the middle ages. The cultures depicted are loosely based on Mongols, Chinese, Indians and Persians. The European-analog folks are a distant curiosity, mentioned in passing. Also, there are  cat people. Sarcastic, long-suffering, ass-kicking cat people who are in no way satirical personifications of how the average domestic cat most likely thinks of themselves…

Bear remains a proponent of what I’d call deep tricks rather than cheap tricks; her emotional palette is a mature one, and she never resorts to merely turning up the noise to drive home the stakes of what her characters are facing. This entire series is refreshingly short on angst but never short of things to have feelings about. There is wondrous magic of every flavor (the mysterious realms and ruins of ancient societies, the environmental magic of the world itself, the summoning and binding (or failing to bind, cough) of powerful entities, and the not-always-adequate sorcery of humanity itself. There are gorgeous citadels, murderous ghosts, inconvenient volcanoes, far-ranging plots, perilous portals, secret armies, Rings of Power, a pony with WAY too many points on its character sheet, and a rich exploration of the customs of several vividly described societies. 

If you want a change of pace from Ye Olde Not Really 13th Century England We Swear For Real This Time, this is it. If you want a tightly-written and well-controlled series that lasts exactly the three novels the author planned, this is it. If you want to see Elizabeth Bear at her most simultaneously inventive and accessible, this is it, an affecting tour-de-force and a strong contender for the best fantasy series of recent years.

April 8th marks the release of Elizabeth Bear’s STELES OF THE SKY, the conclusion of her Eternal Sky trilogy. Although Bear has worked on epic themes before, this is her first pure-form epic fantasy, and as she is wont to do she sticks the landing. The first book, RANGE OF GHOSTS, was excellent, but in my opinion its two sequels have surpassed it.

Disclaimer: I have been dating this woman since 2011. But as I often say, I liked her work long, long before that. I rediscover how much I like it with every new project she lets me read.

The term Bear has gleefully borrowed to describe the Eternal Sky sequence is “Silk Road fantasy;” this is a secondary world based on the vast network of trade that ran from the shores of the Pacific to the sands of Arabia and beyond, during the centuries we now think of as the middle ages. The cultures depicted are loosely based on Mongols, Chinese, Indians and Persians. The European-analog folks are a distant curiosity, mentioned in passing. Also, there are cat people. Sarcastic, long-suffering, ass-kicking cat people who are in no way satirical personifications of how the average domestic cat most likely thinks of themselves…

Bear remains a proponent of what I’d call deep tricks rather than cheap tricks; her emotional palette is a mature one, and she never resorts to merely turning up the noise to drive home the stakes of what her characters are facing. This entire series is refreshingly short on angst but never short of things to have feelings about. There is wondrous magic of every flavor (the mysterious realms and ruins of ancient societies, the environmental magic of the world itself, the summoning and binding (or failing to bind, cough) of powerful entities, and the not-always-adequate sorcery of humanity itself. There are gorgeous citadels, murderous ghosts, inconvenient volcanoes, far-ranging plots, perilous portals, secret armies, Rings of Power, a pony with WAY too many points on its character sheet, and a rich exploration of the customs of several vividly described societies.

If you want a change of pace from Ye Olde Not Really 13th Century England We Swear For Real This Time, this is it. If you want a tightly-written and well-controlled series that lasts exactly the three novels the author planned, this is it. If you want to see Elizabeth Bear at her most simultaneously inventive and accessible, this is it, an affecting tour-de-force and a strong contender for the best fantasy series of recent years.


  1. uwakireinaumi reblogged this from adribbleofink
  2. joecrow reblogged this from scottlynch78 and added:
    Brohamster is abso-correcto. Book came via Amazonian swamprat Tuesday, I finished reading it Wednesday instead of...
  3. catb320 reblogged this from scottlynch78
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  5. adribbleofink reblogged this from scottlynch78 and added:
    Agreed on all accounts. Bear’s trilogy is a must read.
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